Author Archives: Michael Rubin

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OSHA Launches Regional Emphasis Program in Southern States Aimed at Protecting Poultry Workers

In view of Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) that poultry workers are twice as likely to suffer serious injuries and six times more likely to get sick on the job than other private sector workers, OSHA launched a new Regional Emphasis Program last week to reduce musculoskeletal disorders and ergonomic stressors affecting industry workers. The targeted states include Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Texas – states that include some of the country’s largest poultry producers. OSHA’s emphasis program will include an initial…

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Demystifying the Process of Contesting an OSHA Citation

Almost without exception, simply reaching for the checkbook to pay an OSHA citation upon receipt of the citation is never advisable. Indeed, one alternative way to resolve a citation is to immediately request what is referred to as an “informal conference” with the OSHA area director. The informal conference, which must take place no later than 15 business days of the employer’s receipt of the citation, is very popular because it presents an opportunity at an early stage of the process to negotiate a penalty…

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OSHA to Focus on Certain Key Hazards During Healthcare Inspections

As announced a few days ago, OSHA is expanding its use of enforcement resources in hospitals and nursing homes to focus on the following recognized hazards: i) musculoskeletal disorders related to patient or resident handling; ii) bloodborne pathogens; iii) workplace violence; iv) tuberculosis; and v) slips, trips, and falls. These hazards represent some of the most common causes of workplace injury and illness in the healthcare industry. Notably, the injury/illness rate for injuries and illnesses to hospital workers (in 2013) was almost twice as high…

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OSHA Citation to General Contractor Underscores the Need for Proper Equipment and Safety and Health Programs

OSHA recently cited a Florida general contractor – retained to restore the concrete finish on high-rise apartment buildings – for 17 “serious” safety and health violations and proposed penalties of $119,000. (A “serious” violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.) The inspection was initiated after OSHA received complaints alleging fall hazards at two work sites. OSHA charges that the company exposed workers to falls of…

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Roofing Contractor’s Failure to Respond to OSHA Citations Could Send Contractor to Jail

In December 2011, a Maine roofing contractor was directed by federal court order to correct violations associated with 11 different OSHA citations and to pay $404,000 in fines and interest that had been imposed previously over the period 2000 to 2011. The 11 citations related to 11 different work sites, and the contractor not only never responded to the initial citations but also never corrected the underlying safety conditions or paid the assessed fines after the citations had turned into final orders. Now, the contractor…

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Updates and Studies: Top OSHA-Related News for the Week

The following are highlights of the OSHA-related news for the week:

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OSHA: Hospital Workers Exposed to Contaminated Laundry

OSHA has cited a New York City hospital after an investigation found workers were exposed to laundry contaminated with blood, bodily fluids, and other infectious materials. Approximately one year ago, the Manhattan hospital allegedly replaced linen laundry bags with thin plastic bags that broke, exposing workers to health hazards. Clothing, sheets, towels and other soiled laundry spewed onto the floor of the basement when bags broke or failed to stay closed as they came down laundry chutes. Employees were further exposed as they gathered and…

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OSHA Form 300A Posting Period to Commence Feb. 1

  Employers with more than ten employees and whose establishments are not classified as a partially exempt industry must record work-related injuries and illnesses using OSHA Forms 300, 300A and 301. From Februay through April, these covered employers are required to post OSHA Form 300A, which summarizes the total number of job-related injuries and illnesses that occurred during 2014 and were logged on OSHA’s Form 300 (the log of work-related injuries and illnesses). The summary must be posted between Feb. 1 and April 30,…

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OSHA Reporting Requirements for Fatalities and Injuries Simplified

Under the OSHA reporting requirements for work-related injuries and fatalities (effective Jan. 1, 2015), employers are required to report all work-related fatalities within 8 hours, and all in-patient hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye within 24 hours of finding out about the incident. The following are the three ways to report any work-related injuries and/or fatalities to OSHA: (1) call 1-800-321-OSHA (6742); (2) call your nearest OSHA area office during normal business hours; or (3) use the OSHA electronic reporting (online) form, available…

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Focusing on Safety (and Potential Recognition) with OSHA’s On-Site Consultation Program

If you are a small or medium-sized business and want to know how you are doing in terms of safety, one option is to simply ask OSHA by participating in its voluntary On-site Consultation Program. If you elect to participate in this program, a consultant will work with you to identify workplace hazards, provide advice on compliance with OSHA standards, and assist in establishing injury and illness prevention programs. On-site Consultation services are confidential, separate from enforcement, and do not result in penalties or…

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