Category Archives: Resource

OSHA Orders Employer to Reinstate Whistleblower and Pay More Than $166,000 in Damages

On July 30, 2013, a pilot refused to fly a medical transport helicopter over mountainous terrain due to a faulty emergency locator transmitter. The employee was placed on administrative leave the next day and was eventually terminated on August 5, 2013. This termination was reported to OSHA and an investigation followed. OSHA found that the pilot’s employer terminated the employee in retaliation for refusing to fly the helicopter. OSHA not only ordered that the pilot be reinstated, but also levied fines totaling $158,000 in back…

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OSHA Form 300A Posting Period to Commence Feb. 1

  Employers with more than ten employees and whose establishments are not classified as a partially exempt industry must record work-related injuries and illnesses using OSHA Forms 300, 300A and 301. From Februay through April, these covered employers are required to post OSHA Form 300A, which summarizes the total number of job-related injuries and illnesses that occurred during 2014 and were logged on OSHA’s Form 300 (the log of work-related injuries and illnesses). The summary must be posted between Feb. 1 and April 30,…

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OSHA Reporting Requirements for Fatalities and Injuries Simplified

Under the OSHA reporting requirements for work-related injuries and fatalities (effective Jan. 1, 2015), employers are required to report all work-related fatalities within 8 hours, and all in-patient hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye within 24 hours of finding out about the incident. The following are the three ways to report any work-related injuries and/or fatalities to OSHA: (1) call 1-800-321-OSHA (6742); (2) call your nearest OSHA area office during normal business hours; or (3) use the OSHA electronic reporting (online) form, available…

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Focusing on Safety (and Potential Recognition) with OSHA’s On-Site Consultation Program

If you are a small or medium-sized business and want to know how you are doing in terms of safety, one option is to simply ask OSHA by participating in its voluntary On-site Consultation Program. If you elect to participate in this program, a consultant will work with you to identify workplace hazards, provide advice on compliance with OSHA standards, and assist in establishing injury and illness prevention programs. On-site Consultation services are confidential, separate from enforcement, and do not result in penalties or…

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Credibility of Injured Employee Key Consideration in Vacating Citation

A recent decision from the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission shows the importance credibility of witnesses can play in any contested action. In this recent matter, the Administrative Law Judge (the court) vacated a citation against a telecommunications and electrical utilities company (the company) in view of – in large part – the “untruthful demeanor” of the injured employee and the fact that the employee appeared to have “an ax to grind” with his employer. By way of background, the injured employee filed a…

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Avoiding OSHA Citations: The Best Defense Is (Also) a Good Offense

In the unfortunate circumstance when an employer receives an OSHA citation, it is comforting to know that numerous procedural and substantive legal defenses exist to limit liability. Of the substantive defenses, one of the most effective is known as the “unpreventable employee misconduct” defense. If successful, it can lead to the outright dismissal of the OSHA citation. While this defense can obviously relieve the immediate headache of the citation, it cannot and should not replace the practice of making worker safety the number-one priority. Indeed,…

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OSHA Tweets New Year’s Reporting Resolutions

As of January 1, 2015, OSHA is setting forth new reporting requirements for employers. According to a recent OSHA “Tweet”, employers will be required to report all work-related fatalities within eight hours and all in-patient hospitalizations, amputations and losses of an eye within 24 hours of learning of the aforementioned accidents. Employers are advised that reporting to OSHA may be performed through the OSHA website or by contacting OSHA via telephone. The New Year’s resolution changes the former reporting requirements. Under the “lame duck” requirements…

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OSHA Standards Protect Workers from Exposure to Ebola

Can an employer receive an OSHA citation for failing to protect its employees from exposure to the Ebola virus? Surprisingly, the answer is yes. While most workers in the United States are unlikely to encounter the Ebola virus, workers whose jobs involve healthcare, airline and other transportation operations, cleaning, and environmental services, may be at higher risk for exposure. Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (“OSH Act”), employers are responsible for ensuring that workers are protected from exposure to the virus. OSHA actually has…

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Contesting an OSHA Citation – Some Basics

An OSHA citation usually comes at the worst time. Actually, is there ever a good time? Probably not. But, what if after receiving a citation you realize you do not agree with it? Or, perhaps, you cannot deny that the violative conduct occurred, but you believe certain mitigating factors should be taken into account that might warrant dismissal of the citation or a reduction of the penalty. If these thoughts are coming to mind, you may have a basis to challenge the citation. In order…

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OSHA Seeks Input on Updating Chemical Exposure Standards

If you work with or manufacture potentially hazardous chemicals, OSHA wants to hear from you. OSHA has recently launched a national dialogue in an effort to increase the prevention of work-related illness caused by chemicals and hazardous substances. In a YouTube video introducing the initiative, Dr. David Michaels, the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, commented that “[m]any of our chemical exposure standards are dangerously out of date and do not adequately protect workers.” Dr. Michaels further stated that the process…

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